Game Type Thing

An archive of enjoyable flash, indie, and abandonware games.

Archive for the ‘Adventure’ Category

Being One Series

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So you played Fail-Safe and now you’re in the mood for more creepy sci-fi games, eh? Well I can certainly oblige. Being One is a series of four short games that combine to make one dark and spooky sci-fi story. Perhaps not the most original story, but an entertaining one none the less.

You’re in the dank and filthy subterranean laboratory of Dr. Rycroft, a futuristic mad scientist type whose specialty is experimenting on supernatural beings. You’re not sure who or what you are, but you know something’s been done to you. To escape, you’ll have to make your way up the various floors of the lab, each one housing a different species of creature. You’re not alone though, you have an ally in the form of text messages sent to a cell phone placed right outside your vat. Your mysterious text buddy seems to know a lot about the lab, but is much more concerned with helping you escape than filling you in on what’s going on.

Most of the gameplay concentrates on the usual escape elements of opening doors and getting offline systems to work, but it also has occasional action sequences where you will have to take down an enemy. Sometimes you’ll have a weapon available to you, if not you’ll have to search the environment for ways to defeat your foe. There’s also something to collect in most episodes; blood samples, messages, etc. It can be tricky to find them all, some are very well hidden.

The puzzles are not difficult at all, but if wandering through rooms of weird lab experiments is your kind of thing you’ll have fun with this one. It has a lot of little touches that add to the whole experience. Notes and messages you find throughout the building make both the scientists and the creatures feel real. I really dug the creature specific floors idea, and I admit after finishing the game I immediately set about trying to recreate something similar for my unfortunate supernaturals in The Sims.

So basically, a neat idea, plus simple gameplay, plus a creepy-cool atmosphere make for a game series that is definitely worth your time if you’re a horror or sci-fi lover.

 

You begin in by awaking in a vat of green goo, on the alien floor. It’s obvious that this is no kind of place you want to be,  so you better start looking for a way out.

Play Episode One: Escape the Lab

 

The vampire floor! They can sense you, and are not happy with your presence. This is a fun one if you like horror, but if you’re jumpy or the easily spooked type, you might want to skip this one.

Play Episode Two: Bloodbath

 

As the title implies, this is the dark matter floor. Mysterious even to Dr Rycroft. What’s lurking beyond the dark matter containment field?

Play Episode Three: Dark Matter

 

You’re finally near the surface and almost free! You’ll just have to get past the arachnids and the lycans first.

Play Episode Four: Moonrise

 

Written by Nurse Edna

December 18, 2010 at 6:13 pm

A Small Favor

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A Small Favor takes place in a dystopian world where currency has been replaced by a government-run barter system and the black market favor-trade.  You play a mysterious green fellow who’s racked up quite a debt in favors and is under the thumb of underworld forces until you can repay them. So when you receive instructions to take out Sen. RR Lobe to lessen some of your debt, you have no choice but to obey.

As you can imagine, getting to Sen. Lobe isn’t easy. You’ll need the proper security clearance and even then you can’t just waltz in there with a loaded gun. The two main components of gameplay are the barter system, and the collection of favors. You can pick up all manner of items but when it’s time to barter you’ll have to think hard about whether that empty bottle you’ve been carrying around will ever be useful at some point. If you do get rid of something you end up needing you can always barter something else for it, but again you’ll have to decide what you can give up. Most citizens have either a favor or mission they’d like you to do. Collecting favors helps relieve your debt, but doesn’t have any immediate advantages. Completing missions has more of a direct impact on the game. But remember when being controlled by corrupt forces your only loyalty is to yourself. You don’t have to do all of the missions. In fact it’s pretty tricky to do them all, since some of them cancel each other out. Choosing which ones to complete shapes the way the game will progress.

Navigation is simple, it’s point and click for the most part. Click the gun icon to draw or holster you weapon. Remember to keep it charged as much as possible. You’ll have to deactivate it at the security checkpoint, keep an eye out for somewhere to get it recharged. Your inventory is in the menu and you can combine objects from there. A Small Favor isn’t too long, especially if you choose to play it straight. And there’s really only one outcome, but there are plenty of different ways to get there and that’s what makes this an interesting game.

Play A Small Favor

Written by Nurse Edna

December 12, 2010 at 2:15 pm

Fedora Spade Playthrough

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I downloaded Fedora Spade after coming across a screenshot and seeing that it was clearly styled after one of my most beloved games of all time: Deja Vu (more on that game in a future post).  But instead of a game that puts you in the shoes of a seedy detective, Fedora Spade is a game that tries to beat you to death with exposition.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Nurse Edna

December 7, 2010 at 6:38 pm

Clock Tower: The First Fear

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I mentioned Clock Tower in the Dark Visions post and if you liked that one, you should give this a try. You play Jennifer, one of a group of orphans recently adopted (sight-unseen) by wealthy recluse Mr. Barrows. You’re taken to his creepy mansion called the Clock Tower and things go pretty much just as you’d expect them to whenever innocent orphans meet scary houses.

The gameplay is unusual and requires a bit of determination. You will run into the horror that lurks in the mansion, and you won’t be a match for it. You’ll have to hide or flee if you want to survive. Be sure to save often. The tense feeling of helplessness the game creates is one of the reasons Clock Tower has been called the scariest game ever made for the Super Nintendo.

Clock Tower was never officially released outside of Japan, but there is an unofficial English translated ROM floating around that just requires an SNES emulator to play.

Written by Nurse Edna

December 5, 2010 at 11:48 am

Emily Enough: Imprisoned

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You play Emily Enough, a psychotic heiress who reacts rather badly to a birthday disappointment. Now you’re sentenced to spend the rest of your days in the Claxochem Center for Mental Wellness. Oh Emily, how will you get out of this jam?

Explore the wellness center, make friends and enemies with various patients and staff, look for a way to escape, and perhaps commit a murder or two. The art, music, and dialogue are all playful and well done. The story is dark and tongue-in-cheek. It’s not a game meant to scare, but to appeal to those who enjoy a morbid sense of humor.

Navigation can be a bit of a pain, at times you’ll know where you can exit an area, but might have trouble finding just the right place to walk to take you out. All the command buttons are hidden at the top of the screen, you just need to mouse over it to bring them into view. You can also cycle through the actions by right clicking.

I’d like to note that this game was my introduction to the Adventure Game Studio engine, and inspired me to make my own adventure game. But calling the thing I made a game would be extremely generous. It’s more accurately called the room I made that has a few things you can click on. Still, it was a fun and rewarding experience and I encourage anyone who’s ever thought about making their own adventure game to give it a try.

Download Emily Enough

Written by Nurse Edna

December 4, 2010 at 11:36 am

Gateway II

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Gateway II was created for the second Casual Gameplay Design Competition and won the runner-up prize. It implements the “grow” theme of the competition in what I think is a very clear and creative way. You begin in a stark room empty of everything but a television set and four doors. These gateways open one by one as you collect information about the game’s characters and plot.

The puzzles are pretty classic, and if you’re an avid adventure fan it’s likely you’ll have come across some of them before. And though some of them may be a bit finicky, they are all logical in their way. The atmosphere is chilly, and there is a creepy, voyeuristic feel to the game that fits the story perfectly. Gateway II is not terribly long, so if you’re in the mood for something short and interesting, give this one a play.

Play Gateway II

Written by Nurse Edna

December 3, 2010 at 9:15 pm

Dark Visions

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Dark Visions is part Laura Bow, part Alone in the Dark, and part Clock Tower. Strange things are afoot at Dr Mahler’s Manor House/Sanitarium, where you are newly employed. Where is your uncle? Why are the party guests locked in the dining room? Where are the bathrooms? You should probably find this stuff out.

Things are fishy from the start when you arrive at your uncle’s manor. Dr Mahler is nowhere in sight, you’re greeted by an assistant who’s eager to hustle you out of the way into your room, and there’s a strange party going on behind closed doors. It doesn’t take long to decide that you had better search the house for your uncle.

Dark Visions’ 3D graphics are impressive and unusual for a browser game. The length of the game, and size of the house to explore make for a satisfying and immersive experience without dragging on too long. Gameplay is pretty standard for a point-and-click adventure, the three interaction buttons (look, action, walk) are at the bottom of the screen, choose one and click the object or place you want to walk to. The inventory is located at the very bottom, below the text box. There are times when quick action will be required, but you’ll have time to react if you think on your feet.

Dark Visions is a great little game for the browser that feels like a bigger download game. I definitely recommend it if you are a fan of atmospheric gothic horror games.

Play Dark Visions

Written by Nurse Edna

December 1, 2010 at 11:05 am